Project: converting table to a bathroom vanity 1

On a recent trip out of the city, we found an antique table ($120) that will be converted for the vanity in the powder room remodel. When we got it home, it looked even better then we thought!

 

In the past I’ve used Handi-Strip and personally have had little luck with it. Lately, I’ve started using NEXT paint stripper as it is biodegradable and actually works! However, it does go on thin and it also needs time. Use a paint thinner to remove the residue the stripper leaves. 

Since we will be using a glaze, it’s important for every groove to be well defined. A variety of tools were used: a metal bristle brush, hand held sanding blocks with a slanted edge, metal scraper, bendable steel brush pads, and the Mouse Sander.

Before sanding we fixed one of the pieces on the decorative trim by recyling off a piece we had taken off the drawer front (we won’t be using the drawer so it was removed). It was attached with glue and finishing nails; put through pre-drilled holes and then gently tapped down.

4th from left to right is damaged
new piece in front ready to be glued

Luckily, all four spindle pieces (one in each corner) were in good condition. If not, we would have moved the two that would be against the wall to the front (the best ones) and not replaced the back spindles.

Next, a coat of latex enamel priming paint, tinted gray, was applied with a bristled brush. A foam brush would have worked but I find they start to split when using it to push into recessed spaces. Spraypaint primer would have also worked, but I just prefer paint. Of course a professional, spray paint application would have been optimum.

All the lovely detail emerges
primed table ready for sanding

Paint brush marks are slightly visible but are not after being hand-sanded with Fine grade sandpaper. Special attention is paid to the grooves, spindles and decorative trim as these areas will highlight the glaze endcoat. The tabletop is unimportant as it will be covered with granite when converted to the bathroom vanity.

Primer is left to dry for 24 hours before the first THIN layer of semi-gloss latex paint (Valspar Waverly Classics – Gull W38006A) is applied with a foam roller. When loading the roller, do not saturate it with paint. Bring it down and get it slightly wet, then roll it in the upper portion of the tray (where the paint does not sit) to get it evenly covered.

The first coat is lightly sanded (Fine) and left to dry for 24 hours. Second coat is also lightly worked with with steel wool. It’s important that all drips, if any were made, are removed.

TIP: When painting a table, I like to put it upside down on sawhorses for the first coat; then I flip the table right side up and work on any missed areas. Working upside down seems to minimize the chance of missing drips vs. if you had started working with the table right side up.

Next, a layer of Valspar’s Antiquing Glaze (ready made black glaze from Lowes) is applied. It has a 15 minute working time so if you need more time, dilute it with the transculent mixing glaze it adds more working time. This paint color and glaze was the same as used on the cabinets in the bathroom.

Finally, two top protective coats are applied in a water-based, varnish. If applying a varnish over latex paint, it must be water-based or you’ll end up with some nasty bubbling and/or yellowing. Varnish also needs to be applied with a nice brush, not a roller. First coat is sanded (Very Fine) before the last coat.

The top of the table isn’t worked with glaze because in the end it will be covered with a marble top once it is fitted into the bathroom as the vanity. Not quite done… still have to select the marble countertop, the vessel sink and the faucet for it to become the downstairs, powder room vanity.